Is Jailbait Archives A Scam?

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is jailbait archives a scam 18643
is jailbait archives a scam 18643

In March 2014, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) arrested John W. Davis and charged him with identity theft and bank fraud. The illicit activities transpired through rJailBaitArchives website that Davis managed.

According to the indictment, between January 2013 and February 2014, Davis stole over $1 million from dozens of victims after he obtained personal information about them that included their credit card numbers and expiration dates; he then used this information to make online purchases without their knowledge or consent.

Why is Jailbait Archives A scam?

1. JailBaitArchives.com is a reminder of the untrustworthiness of the internet. 

The website was set up by someone who committed a major crime and they were caught. Why would they lie?

2. The messages are interesting and a lot of fun to read. 

You would think it was real because almost every message is from an actual inmate. Even the response messages from the inmates are authentic and read like something that an inmate would say.

3. The stories are so unbelievable you absolutely have to believe them! 

They calmly tell how they met some woman in a bar, show photos of “her” laying in her hotel room, and describe how they were basically forced into having sex with her against their will (and without any protection). The stories are very convincing and made me do a double-take when I first read them (which happened a lot).

4. The site is 100% free, making it one of the most inexpensive scam sites on the internet. 

This means that the only cost is a little time when you read their stories. Even though there are a few other scams that are free, JailBaitArchives.com still sticks out as the least expensive site around…so how could I resist?

Why are so many people falling for it?

You might be wondering why so many people fall for this scam like I did. The reason why so many people fall for this scam is because they do not take into consideration that there are a number of reasons why one may accept these kinds of stories as being true.

1. The website often presents itself as a genuine news source. 

The website has a variety of “media partners” that are listed on their main page. These partners include outlets like the Daily Mail and the New York Post among others. The main reason I did not catch this was because the site would link to these articles and reports as if they were credible sources, even though they are not. 

2. “Prison Stories” sounds very legitimate

It is often used by other scam websites in their titles as well (which is one of the most telling signs that they are fake). There was a highly popular site called “PrisonSucks.com” that I checked during my research, and it too is a scam site.

3. The stories are often posted by “people” who claim to be inmates

You can get away with presenting yourself as someone who has been in jail if your story is believable enough, especially when you present yourself as an inmate who has been wronged or treated poorly and may have legitimate reasons to go after the person who treated them unfairly. As far as the people who are writing these stories, most of the ones that I saw were using fake names like “Yves Hamilton,” which is an easy way to tell they were lying (they were also usually not following grammar rules very well).

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4. The stories of the inmates are very believable

The most convincing thing about these stories is that they are extremely personal, which makes them much easier to swallow. As I said above, people actually tend to like hearing stories about themselves, especially when they are told in the first person.

What can you do if you fall for the scam?

You should never loan money to someone you don’t know who has been convicted of a crime or who claims to be an inmate (as there’s rarely any honor among thieves). You should also always verify information before giving it out to other people. These are two things I didn’t do, and they were two mistakes that I regret. If you have any doubts about the authenticity of a company, person or website, do some research before giving out any valuable information to them.

To learn more about how these scams work, including how other people are being scammed through various methods online, check out my website:

A further investigation on JailBait Archives revealed that it is actually a scam designed to steal your personal information. It is not at all linked to any law enforcement agency or any state prison department. Those who have been victimized by this website should immediately contact their bank for identity theft protection and credit monitoring services.

The website also provides information on how to file a criminal complaint with the FBI in your jurisdiction.

Conclusion:

It is quite obvious that this website is not authentic and is actually designed to steal your personal information. In fact, there is no jail or prison associated with its address. It also doesn’t seem like it would be too hard to fake. I found a similar website that used the same name but was designed so you could send faxes from (and receive faxes from) an inmate, just like on Jailbait Archives.

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